Start With The Basics - Diet 

Here you can find pancakes, pizza and pie crust ideas. Enjoy!

  1. Reduce or eliminate all sources of refined white sugar in the meals. They simply supply unnecessary "empty calories" (calories devoid of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients needed for growth and health).
  2. Eliminate foods containing artificial colors and flavors were eliminated.
  3. Limit the amount and type of food preservatives allowed in the processed foods you use. Some preservatives had been shown to cause undesirable behavior, such as hyperactivity and restlessness.
  4. Work toward finding alternatives of your family favorites first.

AND IF YOU ARE HAVING A REALLY HARD TIME CHANGING
We recommend you read the little book 
"Who Moved My Cheese!" by Spencer Johnson, M.D.

Sugar:

Sugar is easy to substitute so start right away if you can:

1 cup white sugar          = 1/2 – 3/4c honey
                                    = 2/3 – 3/4 c maple sugar
                                    = 2/3 – 3/4 c fruit juice concentrate
                                     (make sure does not have corn syrup)
                                    = 1 cup date sugar
                                    = 2/3 to 1 cut Sucanat (dried can juice granules)

Brown sugar                 use half the amount called for, substitute maple syrup 
Molasses                     honey or maple syrup

Milk Ideas if Soy is not tolerated:

Milk                            nut milk, coconut milk 
Butter                         olive oil, nut oils, flax oil, grape seed oil, coconut oil 
Yogurt                        coconut milk 
Sour cream                 chilled coconut milk combined with a few drops of lemon juice 
Whip cream                chilled coconut milk flavored with a bit of honey or orange zest 

Eggs:

For each Egg:          1 t Ener-G Egg Replacer (easiest to use)
                               2 t flax seed with 1/4 cup of water in blender until foamy

Vinegar:

Check this one off your list quickly too by only choosing to cook with Apple Cider Vinegar and leave your White Vinegar for solving house cleaning issues.  If apple cider is not tolerated try apple juice with a bit of lemon.

Also small amounts can be substituted with lemon or lime juice. Rule of thumb: With tomato based recipes use lime. With fruit recipes use lemon.

Flour:

Easy Flour Substitutes. Don't be afraid to prepare these ahead of time. Put them in plastic tubs and try them out. The dough will be different than what you are used. Don't get discouraged, eventually it feels fine. The following chart shows those flours which may be substituted for wheat or gluten based flours. Good luck!  

FLOUR
(To replace 1 cup of flour)
AMOUNT TO SUBSTITUTE FLOUR
(To replace 1 tablespoon of wheat flour as a thickener)
AMOUNT
Amarauth flour* 1 Cup Agar(Kanten) 1 1/2 t
Barley Flour* 1 1/3 Cup Arrowroot 1 1/2 t
Buckwheat Flour* 7/8 Cup Bean Flour 3 t
Corn Flour 1 1/3 Cup Corn Starch 1 1/2 t
Corn Meal 1 Cup Gelatin Powder 1 1/2 t
Garbonzo
(Chick Pea) Flour
3/4 Cup Guar Gum 1 1/2 t
Kamut Flour* 7/8 Cup Kudzu Powder 3/4 t
Millet Flour* 1 Cup Oat Flour* 1 T
Nuts (finely ground) 1/2 Cup Sweet Rice Flour 1 T
Oat Flour 1 1/3 Cup Rice Flour 1 T
Potato Starch Flour 3/4 Cup Rice Flour (Brown/White) 1 T
Quinoa Flour* 1 Cup Tapioca Flour 1 1/2 T
Rice Flour* (Brown/White) 7/8 Cup Quick Cooking Tapioca (Pre-cooked) 2 t
Rye Flour* 1 1/4 Cup Xanthan Gum 1 T
Soy Flour 1/2 Cup + 1/2 Cup Potato Starch Flour

Spelt Flour* 1 Cup

Sweet Rice Flour 7/8 Cup

Tapioca Flour 1 Cup

Teff Flour* 7/8 Cup
* Avoid if gluten sensitive

And some workable recipes

Pancakes, Waffles and Cookies

For 1 cups of white flour
            1 cup    White rice flour
            1 T        Tapioca flour
            2 T        increase liquid

Crackers and Pizza Crust

2 parts    white rice flour
2/3 part   potato starch
1/3 part   tapioca flour

I use a package of yeast when I make pizza dough. Luckily everyone here can tolerate yeast.

Gravies and Sauces

Tapioca flour makes a very thick sauce that cools a bit sticky, clear color.
White Rice Flour is also a good substitute
Corn Starch works if tolerated
Potato Starch works well

All Purpose Flour

4 c        Brown Rice Flour
1 1/2 c  Sweet Rice Flour
1 c        Tapioca Starch
1 c        Rice Polish
1T         Guar Gum/Xanthium Gum

I make in a plastic tub and seal it tight.

Mock Graham Cracker Crust
4          Health Valley Rice Bran Cakes 
            (Crushed)
1 T        Honey or Maple Sugar
2 T        Canola Oil

Mix and press into pie or press form pan. Bake 325 8-10 minutes

For simple fruit topping use honey, tapioca starch and water with fresh fruit (rhubarb, berries, apples, peaches, etc.) and sprinkle with additional crumbs.

Yummy Pie Crust

1 c       brown rice flour
c      brown sugar packed
1/3 c    table spread or butter
3-4 T   soy milk or other milk substitute 

Mix and form into ball. Press in 9” pie plate and bake at 425 for 8-12 minutes. Fill with your favorite filling….

Cookie dough kids can roll

2 c        Barley or ground oat flour
             (if not allergic)
2 T        dry milk powder (can use
             non dairy infant formula)
1/4 t      salt
2 t         Vanilla
6 T        grapeseed oil
6 T        honey or maple syrup
1/4 c     apple juice or ice water

Combine dry ingredients, stir in oil then add sweetners, vanilla, and liquid. Knead gently to form a ball. Divide dough in half and roll on lightly floured surface. Cut with cookie cutters and place on lightly oiled cookie sheets. Baker 15-20 minutes in preheaded 300 degree oven. Can also use for a sweet cookie style piecrust!

Variations to add: 

Chocolate:
2 T cocoa powder

Spice
1/2 t cinnamon, 
1/2 t nutmeg 
1/3 t allspice

Ginger
2T powdered ginger
6 T molasses instead of honey or maple sugar
1/4 t baking soda            

 

Injera (Ethiopian Flat Bread)

1 3/4 c Teff white or Teff brown flour
3/4 c    Barley flour 
           (Brown Rise, Quinoa, Millet or
            White Rice flour will also work)
1 pk     Dry yeast, about 1 tablespoon
2 1/2 c Warm water
1/2 t     Baking soda
1/2 t     Sea salt

Combine the flours and yeast in a ceramic or glass bowl. Add the warm water and mix into a fairly thin, smooth batter. Let the mixture sit for three full days at room temperature. Stir the mixture once a day. It will bubble and rise.

When you are ready to make the injera, add the baking soda and salt and let the batter sit for 10 to 15 minutes. Heat a small, no stick 9 inch skillet. When a drop of water bounces on the pan's surface, take about 1/3 cup of the batter and pour it in the skillet quickly, all at once. Swirl the pan so that the entire bottom is evenly coated, then return to the heat.

The injera is cooked on only one side and the bottom should not brown. When the moisture has evaporated and lots of "eyes" appear on the surface, remove the injera. Let each injera cool and then stack them as you go along.

If the first injera is undercooked, try using less of the mixture, perhaps 1/4 cup, and maybe cook it just a bit longer. Be sure not to overcook it.

Injera should be soft and pliable so that it can be rolled or folded like a crepe.

If you like the taste of sourdough, this is a wonderful alternative. Injera is a pliable, slightly fermented flat bread unique to the highlands of Eritrea and Ethiopia. It is an indispensable accompaniment to Doro Wat. Made of teff, a member of the millet family, injera is light, with a somewhat spongy texture. Liz seems to do well with both Teff and Millet and we have discovered that we can use Barley flour to make a wonderful product.

FAS/E is the largest cause 
of mental retardation in USA
to understand FAS/E from the inside out get

The Best I Can Be: 
Living With Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Effects

The Best I Can Be: Living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Effects
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